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A Fascist Century: Essays by Roger Griffin by Matthew Feldman (eds.)

By Matthew Feldman (eds.)

Ten essays at the nature of fascism by means of a number one student within the box, targeting the best way to comprehend and follow fascist ideology to varied events because the 20th century, Mussolini's prophesied 'fascist century'. comprises experiences of fascism's tried temporal revolution; Nazism as prolonged case-study; and fascism's postwar evolution.

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A Fascist Century: Essays by Roger Griffin

Ten essays at the nature of fascism via a number one student within the box, targeting the best way to comprehend and follow fascist ideology to numerous events because the 20th century, Mussolini's prophesied 'fascist century'. contains reports of fascism's tried temporal revolution; Nazism as prolonged case-study; and fascism's postwar evolution.

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Herbert is able to signal to Inge that he has never forgotten her by having a radio show play the music they heard at the Olympics when they fell in love. This emphatically supports Schulte-Sass’ central thesis that the Nazi cinema aesthetically engineers an alternative temporality to that of Hollywood or liberal democracies. The love-story of two individuals is framed first within the vast physical community forged by the Olympics which not only had unleashed a flood of nationalistic pride, but in the film comes to represent ‘a timeless, unsurpassable experience of wholeness, of life as a dream or work of art, that National Socialism constantly aspires to achieve’.

In the context of such a vision the ‘monumental’ – such a major feature of Fascist (and all totalitarian) art – acquires specific connotations. It refers to a cult of remembering practised not in a conservative spirit, but in a revolutionary one: the past is to be remembered in order to regenerate the present and transform the future. 43 The academic best illuminating the specifically temporal aspect of this enterprise is Mabel Berezin. 44 Berezin goes on to demonstrate the vital role played by ritual in enabling ordinary Italians to imagine that they belonged to a ‘new political community’, then – crucially for our thesis – she devotes a whole chapter to the Fascist bid to ‘colonise time’.

The French Revolution viewed itself as Rome incarnate. In other words, a revolution is a moment when a mythically charged ‘now’ creates a qualitative change in the continuum of history, a change that fundamentally opposes undifferentiated ‘clock’ time, the invisible medium in which all events ‘happen’. Benjamin continues (my italics), The awareness that they are about to make the continuum of history explode is characteristic of the revolutionary classes at the moment of their action. The great revolution introduced a new calendar.

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